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Archive for the ‘SCVMM R2’ Category

VMM hotfixes… The entire collection :)

September 23, 2010 Leave a comment

This article describes recommended updates to install to address issues when you are managing hosts or are performing a physical-to-virtual (P2V) conversion by using Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2.

Use the information in the “More information” section to help you determine whether a particular hotfix or update applies to your environment.

Now time for the collection

Press here… Or there :) http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2397711

do not forget that one too http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2308590

Categories: SCVMM, SCVMM R2, VMM Tags: ,

VMM Tricks: VMM Self Service Portal and NLB

September 21, 2010 1 comment

A very interesting question in Technet forums about VMM SSP high availability

“Virtual Machine Manager does not support Network Load Balancing (NLB) clusters in Windows Server 2008, which are required in order to distribute the network traffic among self-service users on multiple Web sites.
what problems or issues present this configuration?”
Well, a basic bing did not get any answer for that so I decided to ask a friend “Brandon” from MS Support and goth that answer
“I understand you are concerning why VMM SSP doesn’t support NLB for load balancing. Please correct me if I have any misunderstanding.

We had  intensively discussed this limitation with our development team previously and the main reasons are that it is not a tested scenario and SSP is not stateless.


1. The main thing is that the SSP is not stateless,  thus when a user connects to it he/she can’t bounce around without a loss of state.

2. we haven’t tested this scenario as a major scenario for VMM 2008 R2.

3. We know customers that are using it for fault tolerance purposes. In order for this to work you need to enable persistence on your load balancer.

Currently , I think the only gain from NLB would be to protect against the web server failure, in which case only the users who were assigned to that webserver would get booted off, but when they login again they would hit the remaining server(s) and be OK. So you can get some mild reliability enhancements but not really performance gains (loading balance). “

I had tested SSP load balancing before and it was fine. I did not get the cahnce to test it in huge production environment but I think I will try to do that.

That all for now folks..

Categories: SCVMM, SCVMM R2, Tips&Tricks, VMM Tags: , ,

P2V fails with Error 2912 0x80072F0C with System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008

August 23, 2010 Leave a comment

Toolbox2When using System Center Virtual Machine Manager (SCVMM) to perform a Physical to Virtual (P2V) conversion, the job may fail at 60% with the following error:

Error (2912)
An internal error has occurred trying to contact an agent on the vmmserver.contoso.com server.

Recommended Action
Ensure the agent is installed and running. Ensure the WS-Management service is installed and running, then restart the agent.

Cause:

During the ‘Make operating system virtualizable’ step, files are copied from the destination host (the server that will host the virtualized system) to the SCVMM Server. This BITS operation fails due to a certificate problem as indicated by the error 0x80072F0C (ERROR_INTERNET_CLIENT_AUTH_CERT_NEEDED).

Resolution:

To resolve this issue, remove the managed host from the SCVMM server and also delete any residual certificates from the host on the VMM server, then re-add the host:

1. On the SCVMM server, remove the managed host from the console. The steps on how to remove a managed host are outlined in the following TechNet article:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc956121.aspx (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc956121.aspx)

2. Now we need to locate and delete any certificates for the Host computer.

3. Open the Certificate console on the SCVMM server.

a. Open a new mmc and add the certificates snap-in.
b. Select the option of ‘computer account’ and ‘local computer’.
c. Select Finish and Ok to load the snap-in.

4. The certificates for the Host computer can be in any of the following locations.

a. Personal Certificates.
b. Trusted People (if the host is W2K8 or W2K8 R2).
c. Trusted Root Authorities (If the host is W2K3).

5. In each store, expand the Friendly Name field and locate the certificate[s] for the Host server that have a Friendly Name starting with ‘SCVMM_CERTIFICATE_KEY_CONTAINER’ followed by either the FQDN / IP address / NetBIOS name of the Host server and delete them.

6. Re-add the host in SCVMM which recreates the certificates as needed.

More Information:

SCVMM uses BITS to transfer payload between SCVMM managed computers. These data transfers are encrypted by using a self-signed certificate generated at the time a host machine is added to SCVMM. If these certificates are missing or corrupted from the SCVMM server or managed computers, the payload deployment job can fail. Deleting the certificates and re-adding the host will cause the certificates to be regenerated.

For the latest information on this issue see the following Knowledge Base article:

KB2385280 – P2V fails with Error 2912 0x80072F0C with System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 or System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2

J.C. Hornbeck | System Center Knowledge Engineer

Categories: Hyper-V R2, SCVMM, SCVMM R2, VMM Tags: , , ,

VMM tricks: How the #VMM Administrator Console Uses Virtual Machine Manager #Cmdlets

August 20, 2010 Leave a comment

System Center Virtual Machine Manager (VMM) 2008 R2 is a server application that you can use to manage virtual machines on a variety of virtualization platforms. As an alternative to using the VMM Administrator Console to administer your Virtual Machine Manager environment, you can use the cmdlets in the Windows PowerShell – Virtual Machine Manager command shell, which is an administrator-focused command-line shell.

The Virtual Machine Manager Administrator Console is built on Windows PowerShell for Virtual Machine Manager. Customers who have installed VMM can access both standard Windows PowerShell cmdlets and VMM cmdlets in the VMM command shell. Windows PowerShell command-line Help for the standard Windows PowerShell cmdlets is provided with Windows Server 2008. The command-line Help for VMM cmdlets is provided with VMM.

The following synopsis of the standard call sequence for a hypothetical VMM Administrator Console operation illustrates the integration of Windows PowerShell and the VMM Administrator Console:

  1. The VMM Administrator Console makes a call to a Windows PowerShell cmdlet.
  2. The Windows PowerShell cmdlet makes a Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) call to the VMM server service.
  3. VMM initiates a job if the operation changes state or is long-running and therefore needs to be audited or monitored asynchronously.
  4. VMM makes calls, as necessary, to read and update the VMM database.
  5. If necessary, VMM makes Windows Remote Management (WinRM) calls to access the remote hosts on which virtual machines are deployed or to access remote library servers on which VMM library resources are stored.
  6. WinRM calls access Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) methods on VMM hosts or library servers. These WMI methods are included with the operating system or with the VMM agent service.
  7. Some of the WMI methods call the Virtual Server component object model application programming interface (COM API).
Categories: SCVMM, SCVMM R2, VMM Tags: , , , , ,

Tuning Windows 2008 R2 SP1 dynamic memory for best performance

July 26, 2010 4 comments

What is Dynamic Memory?

Dynamic memory overview

Dynamic memory allows you to configure a virtual machine so that the amount of memory assigned to the virtual machine is adjusted while the virtual machine is running, in reaction to the amount of memory that is actually being used by the virtual machine.  This allows you to run a higher number of virtual machines on a given physical computer.  It also ensures that memory is always distributed optimally between running virtual machines.

Before enabling dynamic memory in a virtual machine you need to ensure that the latest version of integration services is installed in the virtual machine.You can then enable dynamic memory for a virtual machine using the memory settings under the virtual machine settings.  Once dynamic memory is enabled there are four parameters that you can configure:

  • Initial memory.
    This is the amount of memory that is required to start the virtual machine.  This value needs to be high enough to allow the guest operating system to boot, but should be as low as possible to allow for optimal performance with dynamic memory.The virtual machine will never be assigned less memory than the initial memory value.
  • Maximum memory.
    The virtual machine will not be allowed to use more memory than is specified by this value.  This value can be configured anywhere from the initial memory value up to 64GB.
  • Memory buffer.
    The memory buffer value indicates how much memory is assigned to the virtual machine when compared to the amount of memory actually needed by the applications and services running inside the virtual machine.
    The memory buffer will not be maintained if there is not enough physical memory available in the computer to give every virtual machine its requested memory buffer.
  • Memory priority.
    The memory priority value reflects how memory will be distributed amongst virtual machines if there is not enough physical memory available in the computer to give every virtual machine its requested amount of memory.
    Higher priority virtual machines will be given more memory when compared to lower priority virtual machines with similar settings.

Supported guest operating systems

Dynamic memory is supported for the following guest operating systems:

  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise Edition (32-bit and 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter Edition (32-bit and 64-bit)
  • Windows 7 Ultimate Edition (32-bit and 64-bit)
  • Windows 7 Enterprise Edition (32-bit and 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2008 Enterprise Edition (32-bit and 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2008 Datacenter Edition (32-bit and 64-bit)
  • Windows Vista Ultimate Edition (32-bit and 64-bit)
  • Windows Vista Enterprise Edition (32-bit and 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2003 R2 Enterprise Edition (32-bit and 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2003 R2 Datacenter Edition (32-bit and 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition (32-bit and 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2003 Datacenter Edition (32-bit and 64-bit)

If you enable dynamic memory for a virtual machine that is running an operating system that is not on this list, the guest operating system will only be able to access the initial memory.

For each supported operating system you should follow the published required and recommended memory values prior to installing the latest integration services and enabling dynamic memory.  Once dynamic memory is enabled you can use a lower initial value in order to get the best performance out of dynamic memory.  The maximum memory value should always be greater than the required memory for the operating system that is running in the virtual machine.

Operating System Required Memory Recommended Memory Initial Memory (with DM enabled)
Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise Edition 512MB N/A 512MB
Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter Edition 512MB N/A 512MB
Windows 7 Ultimate Edition 1GB N/A 512MB
Windows 7 Enterprise Edition 1GB N/A 512MB
Windows Server 2008 Enterprise Edition 512MB 1GB 512MB
Windows Server 2008 Datacenter Edition 512MB 1GB 512MB
Windows Vista Ultimate Edition 512MB 1GB 512MB
Windows Vista Enterprise Edition 512MB 1GB 512MB
Windows Server 2003 R2 Enterprise Edition 128MB 256MB 128MB
Windows Server 2003 R2 Datacenter Edition 512MB 1GB 128MB
Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition 128MB 256MB 128MB
Windows Server 2003 Datacenter Edition 512MB 1GB 128MB

Tuning dynamic memory for best performance

If you enable dynamic memory on a virtual machine and are not satisfied with the performance that you receive from the virtual machine, there are multiple configuration changes that you can make to potentially improve performance:

  • Increase the size of the page file inside the guest operating system.
    A larger page file inside the virtual machine allows larger amounts of memory to be added to the running virtual machine if it is needed suddenly.  It also lets the virtual machine run better when the availability of physical memory is limited.
  • Increase the memory buffer configured for the virtual machine.
    Increasing the memory buffer will result in more memory being assigned to the virtual machine when compared to the amount of memory actually needed by the applications and services running inside the virtual machine.  This extra memory can then be used for file caching purposes, and may help with the performance of IO intensive applications and services.
  • Increase the initial memory for the virtual machine.
    Some applications assign fixed amounts of memory based on the amount of memory available when the application first starts.  These applications will perform better with higher values for the initial memory.
    Alternatively, if you are seeing poor performance due to too much memory being removed from the virtual machine, increasing the initial memory value can also alleviate this problem.
    It should be noted that by increasing the initial memory value, the overall flexibility and effectiveness of dynamic memory is reduced.
  • Host Reservation

Virtual Machines with Dynamic Memory enabled could consume all memory on the host, leaving nothing for the parent partition.  That’s why we have a new registry key:

  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ Virtualization
  • REG_DWORD value
  • Name = MemoryReserve
  • Setting = amount of MB to reserve for the parent partition, e.g. 2GB RAM.

You must reboot the host after setting this registry value.

Increase the virtual machine memory priority.
Increasing the virtual machine memory priority will ensure that available physical memory is assigned to this virtual machine before being

Source: Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows 7 Service Pack 1 Test Focus Guide

Updated with Host Reservation

SCVMM and Windows 2008 R2 SP1 Dynamic Memory support

July 23, 2010 2 comments

This is a very important question… When SCVMM will support Dynamic Memory feature introduced in Windows 2008 R2 SP1 Hyper-V server?

There is less public information about the new features that integrated with Windows 2008 R2 SP1 so far, So I had to check with MS private newsgroup.

Brandon for newsgroup came back with this answer ” I had consulted our SCVMM product team and the answer I got is there will be a “feature pack” for SCVMM 2008 R2 that will add-in the capability to manage the new Dynamic Memory feature coming in Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1.  Our product team will try to RTM SCVMM package very shortly after the RMT date of Windows 2008 R2 SP1. There will be no SCVMM support for pre-release builds of Windows 08 R2 SP1 until the RC milestone. “

Service Pack 1 for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 will be released “within the first half of calendar year 2011,” Microsoft announced this week.

The service pack is currently available as a beta for test purposes, having been released earlier this month. However, this week, Microsoft published a FAQ on the SP1 beta, which disclosed the approximate product release date for the service pack, perhaps for the first time.

So nothing expected before the first half of calendar year 2011.

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